Games as human drama

A coda to my Last Word on Ludology v Narratology:

In this moment from the popular British sit-com Gavin and Stacey (BBC 2007-2010) — available now in the US on several streaming services including youtube and very worth watching — Nessa, a jaded woman of the world who now works in a small Welsh video arcade, explains why she is never bored watching customers play videogames:

 

My Syllabus for Fall 2015 Principles of Interaction Design

This is the current draft (subject to some refinements and revisions) of this semester’s syllabus. Syllabus LMC6313_F15 v0811

HER STORY – An innovative interactive mystery built around a compelling performance

Sam Barlow’s new story-game HER STORY  uses database searching as a productive approach to interactive narrative.  It demonstrates how the dramatic arts of  script-writing and acting for the camera can be refined to create engrossing interactive storytelling. The story is made up of brief video excerpts from seven police interviews with the same woman, played brilliantly by Viva Seifert. The interactor is given 4 snippets to begin the investigation and then accesses others by typing key words into a search field. . The story is fixed and unchanging, and the case has long ago been solved,  but the interactor is motivated to find out what happened by Barlow’s carefully structured storytelling and the power of Seifert’s performance.   

Here are some of the techniques that make this story effective:

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My CMN15 Slides: Coherent Scenario Design in Computational Narrative

My Keynote from Computer Models of Narrative 2015 : CMN15 Keynote Slides JMurray

Displaying the Affordance Grid as a Radar Chart

Georgia Tech PhD candidate Andy Quitmeyer came up with another way of representing the affordance gird described in Chapter 3 of Inventing the Medium, using the framework of  a radar chart.  Here is his example,  and the downloadable vector file is here.

Example of Affordance Grid as a radar chart, with thanks to Andy Quitmeyer.

Example of Affordance Grid as a radar chart, with thanks to Andy Quitmeyer.

My TED Talk 1998

The folks at TED have kindly dug up for me my 1998 talk which I still stand behind and which predicts the future well, but is also still timely. It is longer than the current crop, and more spontaneous. It falls into 4 segments  and it references other talks, some of which are on the TED website but most of which are not.

 

Here is a summary:

1.PREAMBLE: WE NEED EVERY MEDIUM TO EXPRESS OUR HUMANITY (first 5 minutes) I take issue with Julie Taymor who spoke disparagingly of screen-based experiences, and offered the rituals of Bali dancers ( invoked again in her 20** TED Talk) as the superior paradigm for art that addresses the human condition.  I also take issue with John Warnock, founder of Adobe and a rare book collector who described his meticulously prepared facsimile book series as purposely avoiding interactivity, such as searching by text, which makes it much less useful. I would still consider both positions examples of a fetishism for legacy forms of representation. (first 5 minutes).

2. ELIZA IS OUR CREATION MYTH (5:00 – 17:00) I compare the amazement at the birth of film (the legend of the Ciotat Train showing) to the  amazement at the birth of procedural storytelling (the legend of Eliza at MIT), as I do in Chapter 3 ofHamlet on the Holodeck, and as I have done with my students pretty much every semester for the past 20 years.

3. PROTOTYPE OF A  MULTISEQUENTIAL STORY WORLD STILL AHEAD OF ITS TIME 17:00- 2500)  show an MIT project I created with Freedom Baird, sponsored by IBM and based on Alan Ayckbourn’s trilogy, The Norman Conquest. The TV dramas are also now on YouTube.  They were meant to be seen on three successive nights in any order, and each one is complete in itself but an exit in one play is an entrance in another play. This makes a nice comparison with Mitch Horowitz’s recent work on the Netflix version of Arrested Development, as I discussed in another post.   (timecode: )

4. WHY IS THIS IMPORTANT? (last 30 seconds) I sum up as I do in Hamlet on the Holodeck, by comparing the development of conventions of interaction with the invention of the soliloquy in Shakespeare’s time.

Other references: John Warnock is the founder of Adobe and a rare book collector. At 1998 TED he presented a facsimile book series that purposely avoids interactivity, such as searching by text, which makes it much less useful. This is a good example of what I would now call legacy media fetishism.

Brenda Laurel, feminist game designer and pioneer of interactive storytelling, whose talk on her wonderful but short-lived series Purple Moon, is on the TED site.

Marvin Minsky, one of the seminal theorists of the field of Artificial Intelligence, who has a notorious blind spot for humanistic discourse. In the corridor between sessions Ben Shneiderman and argued with him. Minsky took the position that fictional stories were a waste of time because they were not true. Ben and I were appropriately outraged.

 

Second Screen Applications for Interactive TV

Here are the slides for our presentation from ACM SIGCHI TVX 2014  .  

Companion Apps for Long Arc TV Series
Supporting New Viewers in Complex Storyworlds with Tightly Synchronized Context-Sensitive Annotations

Abhishek Nandakumar, Janet Murray

There are two relevant project pages with videos of eTV Lab projects:  Story Map (for Justified) and Game of Thrones.  
 
The paper is available on the ACM Digital Library
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